HOPOS CFP

 


Proposals for special issues are welcome. We encourage those submitting proposals to consider how the proposed topic provides a platform for historical inquiry into the development and influence of the philosophy of science, including engagement with science and its practice. Ideally, proposals will reflect an empirical approach to the history of philosophy of science. That approach may involve inquiry into research communities and networks, into the contexts of pursuit and of pedagogy, and into the transmission and reception of theories, texts, research questions, and practices.

Proposals should consist of:

1. A title and a 200-word abstract for the special issue itself.

2. Names, affiliations, and emails of Advisory Editors submitting the proposal.

3. A précis of up to 1500 words explaining:

a. The topic or question of the issue;
b. The significance of that theme in the field;
c. The envisioned contribution of the special issue.

4. A list of proposed contributors (including Advisory Editors if they will submit), including titles and 200-word abstracts for proposed papers. A call for papers will be made for all special issues, so the list of potential contributors need not be firm.

5. If you plan to submit write to hoposjournal@gmail.com by September 1, 2017.

6. Final deadline for proposals: November 30, 2017.

** Special note: we welcome proposals based on symposium proposals for the twelfth international meeting of the International Society for the History of the Philosophy of Science (HOPOS) at the University of Groningen.

Click here for the website for the conference, and to submit a paper or symposium proposal for HOPOS 2018.

Those planning to submit a proposal are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the research published in the journal thus far by visiting HOPOS‘s website (click here).

 

Examples of Broad Potential Special Issue Themes

We encourage those submitting proposals to consider how the proposed topic provides a platform for historical enquiry into the development and influence of the philosophy of science, including engagement with science and its practice. Ideally, proposals will reflect an empirical approach to the history of philosophy of science. That approach may involve inquiry into research communities and networks, into the contexts of pursuit and of pedagogy, and into the transmission and reception of theories, texts, research questions, and practices.

Themes below are intended to indicate general directions: to be suggestive, not exhaustive.

Proposals should sharpen and limit the themes to a more specific research focus.

  • The role of scientists in the development of philosophy of science. In the American context, for instance, scientists including W. M. Malisoff, Henry Margenau, and H. J. Mueller had an impact on the development of philosophy of science, and many scientists had an impact on nineteenth century philosophy. What, if anything, do scientists want for or from philosophy of science?

 

  • The context of pedagogy: how are we to interpret scientific and philosophical works that were intended as textbooks? What is the role of textbooks and teaching, including (but not limited to) providing models for scientific practice and for philosophical theory-building?
  • The history of the philosophy of the social sciences and the behavioral sciences, broadly construed to include international contexts and the ‘historical sciences’ (geology, environmental history, archaeology, and the like).
  • How the unique contexts produced by the Cold War shaped the philosophy of science of that period and after, including work on philosophy of science in Russia and the Eastern Bloc.
  • Comparative work on international traditions within science and philosophy of science. How do different communities use texts, argument, and inference? A related inquiry might take up a critical and historical study of work in the philosophy of science that’s based on comparison of traditions, arguments, or approaches.
  • The practical turn: look into the archives of philosophers in order to reconstruct practices of writing, note-taking, and preparing manuscripts and lectures. What constitutes the practices of a philosopher, and what might these actually look like within particular historical periods?
  • Philosophers’ networks at local and global levels. How were issues, ideas, and challenges shared and transmitted within those networks? And how did these networks shape those issues, ideas, and challenges? One focus might be on the history of exchange (transfer, transmission, and the like) at different scales—local or global.

 

Physics: decorative titlepage. Llithograph by J. Emslie, 1850.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images: images@wellcome.ac.uk
Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

 

 

Proposal Review Board

Karine CHEMLA (Université Paris Diderot, CNRS)
Peter GALISON (Harvard University, Black Hole Initiative)
Marco GIOVANELLI (Universität Tübingen, Einstein Papers)
Omar NASIM (Universität Regensburg)
Elisabeth NEMETH (Universität Wien, HOPOS)
Alan RICHARDSON (University of British Columbia, HOPOS)